The Beauty of a Brown Diamond

Did you know that brown diamonds show more flashes of colored light than “colorless” diamonds?

If you are in the market for brown diamonds, be sure to ask your jeweler for an AGS Laboratories Colored Diamond Document. It’s a grading report that presents the technical aspects and nuances of colored diamond grading to jewelry buyers with easy-to-understand verbiage and graphics.

Brown diamonds will no longer be described simply as “a brown diamond,” but will be communicated visually, highlighting the nuances within the diamond’s color. For example, a diamond with even distribution of brown throughout and hints of orange, could be described as a deep, rich, brown diamond with moderate orange accents.

Click the image below to view the Colored Diamond Document.

AGSL-CDD

“Brown diamonds are beautiful and are an alternative choice to the more traditional colorless diamonds. They are also trending as an affordable choice for fine jewelry,” said Jason Quick, Laboratory Director at AGS Laboratories. “We recognized a growing need in the market and decided to create a tool that will truly enhance consumers’ buying experience.”

AGS Laboratories encourages jewelry buyers who are shopping for diamonds to always ask for a diamond grading report from an independent third-party laboratory so that they can better understand the quality of the diamond they are buying. To find an American Gem Society retailer, visit americangemsociety.org/findajeweler.

To learn more about AGS Laboratories Colored Diamond Document, visit agslab.com/browndiamonds.

Here are a few designs we love from members of the American Gem Society that feature brown diamonds.

Spinel: The Coolest Gem You’ve (Probably) Never Heard Of

By Isabelle Corvin, CG, Staff Gemologist at Panowicz Jewelers

Three Spinel Crystals

Red Spinel

Spinel is an oxide mineral that crystallizes in the cubic structure and has quite the mixed-up history.

As of 2016, it is also the newest birthstone to be added to the birthstone list! August babies now have a choice between vivid peridot and alluring spinel.

The word “spinel” comes from the Latin word Spinella, which means “little thorn” or “arrow-shaped.” Spinel gems come in a wide range of colors and saturations, though perhaps the most famous (and mistakenly infamous) is the red variety.

In ancient cultures, red spinel was always grouped together with rubies, and sometimes garnets, since the rough (and even polished and cut) crystals look so similar. In the modern age, the gems can be separated, but much of spinel’s history is tied up in the lore of rubies.

Red spinel ring, by Omi Privé.

Spinel-Omi

The oldest known spinel dates back to 100 B.C. and was found in Kabul, Afghanistan, inside a Buddhist temple. Red and blue spinels were also being used in crafting by the Romans.

The most famous spinel is also the most famous example of mistaken identity in all of gemological history. A “ruby” known as the Black Prince’s Ruby is our culprit. It is a red gem set in the Imperial State Crown of the British crown jewels. The gemstone is uncut, but polished, and weighs approximately 170 carats. The gem has never been removed from its original setting, so the weight is only estimated.

This amazing gemstone, however, is no ruby. It is, in fact, a spinel.

The Imperial State Crown. Image courtesy of GIA.

QueensCrown-lrg

The Black Prince was the son of Edward III, and reportedly received the gem from Don Pedro the Cruel, King of Castille as a reward. Legend has it that the spinel was one of the gems worn by Henry V on his helmet and that it deflected a fatal blow, saving his life during the Battle of Agincourt.

Whether true or not, the gem was thought to be ruby for many years, until technology and the knowledge of gems improved enough to separate gems on more than mere color.

This royal stone is not the only spinel in disguise. Empress Catherine II of Russia had a crown that bore an estimated 400-carat spinel. Likewise, Queen Victoria had a very dark red spinel called the Timur Ruby.

It doesn’t help matters when spinel and ruby often form together in the earth! In 1783, mineralogist Jean Baptiste Louis Rome de Lisle finally separated spinel from ruby, realizing that the two minerals were completely different.

Further confusion arises with spinel’s true nature even now.

Many pieces of inexpensive birthstone jewelry have an imitation of the true birthstone: something that looks like—but isn’t—the real thing. The majority of these are made with synthetic spinel, grown in a laboratory rather than the ground, but boasting the same chemical make-up.

The natural gem is lovely, but many only know of its synthetic counterparts.

Each color of spinel is thought to provide different benefits to the wearer, from protection to enhancing creativity and kindness, to better cognitive abilities. Colorless spinel is rare, and no current mines exist that produce it.

Spinel earrings set in 18k rose gold, by AG Gems.

Spinel-AGGems (2)

The most common colors seen in jewelry are red and blue, with the hues ranging from highly saturated to perfectly pastel.

Other popular colors are yellows, purples, and pinks, although the gem comes in every color. Black spinel is found in many pieces, and once again, is often confused for other black gems like hematite, black diamond, and black onyx.

Black spinel and white sapphire pendant, by Dilamani.

Spinel-Dilamani

Spinel is mined in many locations, including Madagascar, Sri Lanka, Myanmar (formerly Bruma) Brazil, Sweden, Pakistan, and Russia, among others. It can even be found in the USA.

Additionally, small crystals have been found on meteorites, a trait spinel shares with the other August birthstone, peridot.

For a gemstone many have never heard of, it might be the most famous of all. It is the hidden star of the show, silently shining on as the world ignores it or mistakes it for another stone altogether.

Pink spinel and diamond drop earrings, by JB Star.

Spinel-JBstar

But spinel is worth a first, and second, glance. With spectacular colors, excellent durability and an amusing history, it’s the perfect addition to anyone’s gem and jewelry collection.

Spinel truly deserves the title: The Coolest Gem You’ve (Probably) Never Heard Of!

isabelle

Isabelle Corvin is an AGS Certified Gemologist (CG) who is the Staff Gemologist at Panowicz Jewelers. Since she was 14-years-old, she knew she wanted to be a gemologist. Ms. Corvin also writes for Panowicz Jewelers’ blog.

This is not a brown diamond

By Donna Jolly, RJ

You may think this big, beautiful diamond in the ring below is a brown diamond. It is, but it’s so much more. This is a fancy, deep rich diamond with moderate orange accents.

2533

Joshua J Fine Jewelry

Brown diamonds are beautiful, and they vary in their intensity of color and warmth. What adds to their beauty are the accents of different color. Brown diamonds—in fact, colored diamonds in general—usually have more flashes of colored light than colorless diamonds. Their accents can range from pink, red, orange to even green. It gives them depth and adds to their romantic allure.

They are also versatile, depending on the jewelry setting. The ring from Joshua J Fine Jewelry above is elegant and classic, while this gorgeous bangle from Dilamani is fun and modern:

Brown and white diamond bangle, by Dilamani.

Brown and white diamond bangle, by Dilamani.

Bryan Aderhold, CG, owner and president of Nash James Enterprises LLC, sells brown diamonds and is a fan of their warm beauty. “Brown is another one of nature’s wonderful hues,” says Bryan. “Brown diamonds prompt images of earthly matter such as trees, soil, falling leaves, and chocolate! When acting as a modifier for other colors such as pink, brown can help to produce some very interesting and desirable color combinations.”

To show how two brown diamonds can vary in look and in their appeal, check out these two stunning examples. The one on the left is a great example of a brown diamond with pinkish accents, and the one on the right is a fancy dark brown. Both are lovely; it boils down to a matter of preference. The one on the left would look terrific in a rose gold setting and the one on the right would rock a yellow gold setting.

To learn more about brown diamonds, and how they differ from their famous, colorless cousin, click this infographic created by AGS Laboratories. It’s filled with fun and exciting facts about diamonds, and further explains what makes them so rare and unique.

brown-diamond-infographic-1
To find an American Gem Society jeweler near you who can help you find a brown diamond to add to your jewelry collection, click here. Please also ask your AGS jeweler to show you a diamond with the Colored Diamond Document from AGS Laboratories!

3 Gemstones That Sparkle for the 4th of July

By Robin Skibicki

Dilamani

Ruby, diamond, and sapphire brooch by Dilamani.

The American Independence Day—or the Fourth of July—is when we celebrate our country’s freedom and the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. It’s also considered the height of summer!

It’s a time for family reunions, barbeques, picnics, parades, and the much-anticipated fireworks displays. On this day, we proudly display our nation’s colors: red, white, and blue.

Fun Fact: More than 14,000 firework displays are put on across the country on the Fourth of July!

But don’t let those fireworks grab all the attention. Create your own sparkle-fest with three gemstones that will beautify your patriotic style. We’re talking about rubies, white diamonds, and blue sapphires!

In honor of the holiday, we’ve picked a few designs by our American Gem Society members that feature one of the three, aforementioned gemstones. Click on each image below to get a closer look.

Red Rubies

 

White Diamonds

 

Blue Sapphires

 

May your Fourth of July celebration be sensational, safe, and full of sparkle! To find an AGS-credentialed jeweler near you, visit http://www.ags.org/findajeweler.

5 Pieces of Jewelry to Take on Your Summer Vacation

By Robin Skibicki

“Summer, summer, summertime / Time to sit back and unwind.” – DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince, Summertime

As thoughts of summer vacation drift through our heads, so does the ultimate question: “What am I going to pack?!” Whether you’re traveling overseas, across states—or even planning a staycation—it’s good to have a plan.

Although we’d love to help you pick out your various outfits and toiletries—they aren’t our area of expertise. But we CAN give you some great ideas on what jewelry to bring with you.

It’s often a challenge deciding which items of jewelry to take, depending on the outfits you pick. But it’s important to note that it’s best to leave the most valuable and delicate pieces at home. Before you pack, we have this recommended read from Jewelers Mutual Insurance Group: The Pocket Guide to Traveling with Jewelry.

Yet, no outfit is complete without the punctuation of fine jewelry. Here are five pieces from a few of our AGS members that would make great travel companions! Click on the images below to get a closer look.

“Caprice” multiway diamond eclipse earrings, by Mastoloni.
When you can bring one pair of earrings and wear them three different ways, you’re covered! Wear as a dangle, as a diamond and pearl stud, or wear the pearl by itself.

 

Wide diamond band from Gabriel & Co. “Lusso” collection.
A diamond band with alternating 14k yellow and white gold gives the illusion of wearing multiple rings. Easy peasy!


Gabriel-14k-Yellow-And-White-Gold-Lusso-Wide-Band-Ladies-Ring_LR50892M45JJ-3

 

Two-piece convertible diamond heart pendant, by Lisa Bridge, Ben Bridge Jeweler.
This romantic pendant is convertible and can be worn three ways: with both diamond pavé and heart pieces together, or either the center circle or heart frame separately.

 

Rainbow sapphire butterfly brooch, by Dilamani.
A brooch you say? You bet! Dress up any top, scarf, hat—or even a hairstyle—with a brooch. A brooch can also be turned into a pendant with the addition of a chain. So many style options!

 

Custom reversible classic chain bracelet, by John Hardy.
Here’s another “gem” we found: one bracelet with two looks! John Hardy gives you the opportunity to customize your own chain bracelet with any gemstone look. Below is the combo we designed. The 18k bonded gold side sparkles with diamond pavé. The sterling silver side has a pop of color with amethyst. Which look would you create for yourself?

 

Visit an American Gem Society jeweler near you for more helpful hints on what to bring—and what not to bring—on your summer vacation. Happy travels!

Get to Know Your Brown Diamond

AGS Laboratories recently unveiled their new Colored Diamond Document, a grading report that presents the technical aspects and nuances of colored diamond grading to jewelry buyers with easy-to-understand verbiage and graphics.

Brown diamonds will no longer be described simply as “a brown diamond,” but will be communicated in an easy-to-understand visual way, highlighting the nuances within the diamond’s color. For example, a diamond with even distribution of brown throughout and hints of orange, could be described as a deep, rich, brown diamond with moderate orange accents.

Click the image below to view the Colored Diamond Document.

AGSL-CDD

“Brown diamonds are beautiful and are an alternative choice to the more traditional colorless diamonds. They are also trending as an affordable choice for fine jewelry,” said Jason Quick, Laboratory Director at AGS Laboratories. “We recognized a growing need in the market and decided to create a tool that will truly enhance consumers’ buying experience.”

AGS Laboratories encourages jewelry buyers who are shopping for diamonds to always ask for a diamond grading report from an independent third-party laboratory so that they can better understand the quality of the diamond they are buying. To find an American Gem Society retailer, visit americangemsociety.org/findajeweler.

To learn more about AGS Laboratories Colored Diamond Document, visit agslab.com/browndiamonds.

Here are a few designs we love from members of the American Gem Society that feature brown diamonds.

Celebrate the Woman Who Means Everything

By Robin Skibicki

“Being a mother is about learning about strengths you didn’t know you had and dealing with fears you didn’t know existed.” – Linda Wooten, author.

When I was 9 years old, I asked my Mom on Mother’s Day why there isn’t a Children’s Day. Without hesitation, she responded in a kind but firm voice, “Honey, EVERY DAY is Children’s Day.” I knew that tone and I also detected that wasn’t the best question to ask at that moment.

Now that I’m a mom, I get it! In fact, I believe mothers truly need more than one day a year to call their own. How about once a month? The list of gratitude towards our mothers can be infinite, from the little things, like kissing a “boo-boo,” to jumping in with all her heart and soul to help us through a rough situation.

Nowadays, we realize that Mother’s Day isn’t just about mothers. The holiday extends to celebrate all the incredible women who have made significant contributions in our lives, helping us become who we are today. She can be a stepmom, mother-in-law, grandmother, daughter, daughter-in-law, aunt, sister, cousin, friend, teacher, or mentor.

If you are looking for a gift that is beyond special and significant for a fabulous female in your life, consider fine jewelry. They’re not only gifts that will make her smile (possibly with a glistening tear in her eye) once she opens it, but each day she wears it. She will treasure it for years to come and it will ultimately become a cherished heirloom.

The credentialed members of the American Gem Society (AGS) have got you covered for Mother’s Day. Here are a few ideas to get you started. If there is a design you like or have an idea of your own, contact an AGS jeweler near you!