Quote-worthy Jewelry

We often share beautiful images of  American Gem Society members’ jewelry. Today, we wanted to take that a step further and give you a sneak peek into their passion for jewelry, the symbolism it represents, and the way it makes them feel. In some cases, we just wanted to give you a glimpse of their humor, with jewelry as their much-adored punchline.

To achieve all that, we asked these five members to give us a quote about jewelry, along with an image of one of their favorite pieces. Enjoy!

paula Crevoshay

Opal brooch from Paula Crevoshay.

 

Spinel pendant from Sharon Wei Designs

Pink tourmaline pendant from Sharon Wei Designs.

 

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Moonstone, sapphire, and diamond ring from Omi Privé.

 

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Custom-designed ring from Michaels Jewelers.

 

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Diamond engagement ring by Tacori.

To find some jewelry inspiration of your own, visit your local American Gem Society (AGS) jeweler. Ask your AGS jeweler if they have a personal saying or a favorite quote about jewelry! You can ask them to show you one of the above pieces or something that inspires you and your imagination. Visit ags.org/findajeweler.

What’s That Bracelet (REALLY) Worth?

By David Craig Rotenberg, ECGA (AGS), GG (GIA), CSM (NAJA), CAPP (ISA)

 

Gold Jewelry  With Gems , Chains Close Up Macro Shot Isolated OnJewelry appraisals are important documents that are required for insurance valuations, the settling of an estate, determining the value for tax deductions for charitable contributions, for casualty loss evaluations, or perhaps the division of property in a divorce.

The appraisal is simply a means of factually communicating what a piece of jewelry is worth. It’s the item’s value assessed by quantitative and qualitative aspects as determined by a skilled professional appraiser. This individual should not only understand the science of valuation, but should be able to properly communicate the background on exactly how he or she arrived at that assessment.

Insurance Appraisals

Insurance appraisals are used by insurance companies to determine exactly what cost is required to replace an exact piece of jewelry in the current climate in the event of theft or loss. The appraiser provides a full evaluation of the item, including a detailed description of quality and special nuances of the item. While each insurance company may operate differently, most won’t simply accept purchase receipts since the determined “value” is the key when writing a policy or reimbursing a claim.

Appraisal

Settlement Appraisals

It is especially important to have an experienced appraiser when appraising for tax purposes. When someone dies, jewelry must be categorized to determine fair market value in regards to inheritance tax as applied by the IRS. Fair market value is a different determination than replacement value, which you obtain for insurance purposes. In terms of a divorce, an appraisal might be required to help determine equitable distribution of property. Jewelry is part of the “estate” and needs to be categorized for tax purposes.

The Process

After you contact a jewelry appraiser, they will sit down with you and review the items you want to be appraised. The condition of an item is extremely important; a broken watch from the 1960s, for instance, might be valued like a typical flea market item while a vintage Rolex in great condition from the same time period would be appraised at what it would bring on the second-hand market. Diamond rings normally have laboratory reports evaluating their quality. New jewelry that is being appraised for insurance purposes should be accompanied by receipts from the store where purchased so the appraiser can refer back to the original jeweler if there are questions.

 

Finding a Qualified Jewelry Appraiser

You can contact the American Gem Society (AGS) for a list of certified appraisers in your area. Certification by the AGS indicates that the individual is not only a certified appraiser, but also an expert gemologist. The AGS is one of the oldest nonprofits dedicated to consumer protection in the industry. A certification will usually be displayed in the appraiser’s workspace—this certificate required a lot of time and effort and the appraiser will want to show it off!

Other reputable organizations include the National Association of Jewelry Appraisers (NAJA) and the American Society of Appraisers (ASA). Some people ask if it’s necessary to obtain two appraisals; in most cases, this shouldn’t be necessary, especially if you’re confident you’ve gone to a qualified appraiser.

Over the Years

Before the 1980s, there wasn’t a lot of formal appraisal education and a jeweler might simply assess an item for what they might sell it for in their own showcase. The average jeweler didn’t have a lot of resources—an item might be sold based on what someone told them it was worth.

With the founding of the International Society of Appraisers (ISA) in 1979, appraisal education became more of a studied science. As gemology education blossomed, jewelers were able to conduct research, compile pricing information and attend continuing education as they used their new-found gemological skills for buying and appraisal purposes. Transparency is critical—an appraiser must be able to thoroughly explain how they arrived at a value.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

DRotenbergDavid Craig Rotenberg is an AGS-certified gemologist appraiser and one of a handful of CAPP (Certified Appraiser of Personal Property) appraisers in gemstones, contemporary jewelry and antique and period jewelry. He is a member of the Jeweler’s Vigilance Committee Appraisal Bar, has studied with the American Arbitration Association, and is past president of the AGS’s Jewelers Education Foundation, founder and past president of the Delaware Valley Keystone Guild and founder and past president of the Delaware Valley chapter of the International Society of Appraisers. Recognized by the Technical Advisory Service for Attorneys (TASA) for his expertise, he is part of the Jeweler’s Vigilance Committee’s appraisal organization and has conducted jewelry appraisals for the U.S. Treasury Department. Most recently, he completed a global leadership program at Harvard University School of Business.

In addition to offering his appraisal services to customers at David Craig Jewelers in Langhorne, PA, David has appraised multi-million dollar inventories for the federal government and many banks. He has conducted evaluations for a large variety of complex estate and bankruptcy matters and fraud investigations. He also operates an AGS-accredited gem lab at David Craig Jewelers.

This is not a brown diamond

By Donna Jolly, RJ

You may think this big, beautiful diamond in the ring below is a brown diamond. It is, but it’s so much more. This is a fancy, deep rich diamond with moderate orange accents.

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Joshua J Fine Jewelry

Brown diamonds are beautiful, and they vary in their intensity of color and warmth. What adds to their beauty are the accents of different color. Brown diamonds—in fact, colored diamonds in general—usually have more flashes of colored light than colorless diamonds. Their accents can range from pink, red, orange to even green. It gives them depth and adds to their romantic allure.

They are also versatile, depending on the jewelry setting. The ring from Joshua J Fine Jewelry above is elegant and classic, while this gorgeous bangle from Dilamani is fun and modern:

Brown and white diamond bangle, by Dilamani.

Brown and white diamond bangle, by Dilamani.

Bryan Aderhold, CG, owner and president of Nash James Enterprises LLC, sells brown diamonds and is a fan of their warm beauty. “Brown is another one of nature’s wonderful hues,” says Bryan. “Brown diamonds prompt images of earthly matter such as trees, soil, falling leaves, and chocolate! When acting as a modifier for other colors such as pink, brown can help to produce some very interesting and desirable color combinations.”

To show how two brown diamonds can vary in look and in their appeal, check out these two stunning examples. The one on the left is a great example of a brown diamond with pinkish accents, and the one on the right is a fancy dark brown. Both are lovely; it boils down to a matter of preference. The one on the left would look terrific in a rose gold setting and the one on the right would rock a yellow gold setting.

To learn more about brown diamonds, and how they differ from their famous, colorless cousin, click this infographic created by AGS Laboratories. It’s filled with fun and exciting facts about diamonds, and further explains what makes them so rare and unique.

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To find an American Gem Society jeweler near you who can help you find a brown diamond to add to your jewelry collection, click here. Please also ask your AGS jeweler to show you a diamond with the Colored Diamond Document from AGS Laboratories!

A Record-Breaking Diamond with a Cause

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Why have one diamond when you can have 6,690 diamonds?  For a cool $4,116,787, it may be possible. Jewelers Vishal Agarwal and Khushbu Agarwal of Surat, India, have broken the Guinness World Record for most diamonds set in one ring.

The jewelers placed the diamonds onto an 18 karat rose gold structure that is shaped like a lotus flower. The ring weighs just over 58 grams and is the size of a golf ball.

Vishal designed the ring which has 48 individual petals, while Khushbu funded the project. This was not just any record-breaking attempt: the lotus flower style was created in order to raise awareness about the importance of water conservation.

“As fame is so much attached to a Guinness World Records title, we can put it to good use by bringing together like-minded people to work towards a beautiful world,” the jewelers said in a statement.

Guinness World Records posted a video chronicling the creation of the ring, including the cutting and placing of the diamonds. Click here to see this beautiful flower come to life!

3 Gemstones That Sparkle for the 4th of July

By Robin Skibicki

Dilamani

Ruby, diamond, and sapphire brooch by Dilamani.

The American Independence Day—or the Fourth of July—is when we celebrate our country’s freedom and the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. It’s also considered the height of summer!

It’s a time for family reunions, barbeques, picnics, parades, and the much-anticipated fireworks displays. On this day, we proudly display our nation’s colors: red, white, and blue.

Fun Fact: More than 14,000 firework displays are put on across the country on the Fourth of July!

But don’t let those fireworks grab all the attention. Create your own sparkle-fest with three gemstones that will beautify your patriotic style. We’re talking about rubies, white diamonds, and blue sapphires!

In honor of the holiday, we’ve picked a few designs by our American Gem Society members that feature one of the three, aforementioned gemstones. Click on each image below to get a closer look.

Red Rubies

 

White Diamonds

 

Blue Sapphires

 

May your Fourth of July celebration be sensational, safe, and full of sparkle! To find an AGS-credentialed jeweler near you, visit http://www.ags.org/findajeweler.

5 Pieces of Jewelry to Take on Your Summer Vacation

By Robin Skibicki

“Summer, summer, summertime / Time to sit back and unwind.” – DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince, Summertime

As thoughts of summer vacation drift through our heads, so does the ultimate question: “What am I going to pack?!” Whether you’re traveling overseas, across states—or even planning a staycation—it’s good to have a plan.

Although we’d love to help you pick out your various outfits and toiletries—they aren’t our area of expertise. But we CAN give you some great ideas on what jewelry to bring with you.

It’s often a challenge deciding which items of jewelry to take, depending on the outfits you pick. But it’s important to note that it’s best to leave the most valuable and delicate pieces at home. Before you pack, we have this recommended read from Jewelers Mutual Insurance Group: The Pocket Guide to Traveling with Jewelry.

Yet, no outfit is complete without the punctuation of fine jewelry. Here are five pieces from a few of our AGS members that would make great travel companions! Click on the images below to get a closer look.

“Caprice” multiway diamond eclipse earrings, by Mastoloni.
When you can bring one pair of earrings and wear them three different ways, you’re covered! Wear as a dangle, as a diamond and pearl stud, or wear the pearl by itself.

 

Wide diamond band from Gabriel & Co. “Lusso” collection.
A diamond band with alternating 14k yellow and white gold gives the illusion of wearing multiple rings. Easy peasy!


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Two-piece convertible diamond heart pendant, by Lisa Bridge, Ben Bridge Jeweler.
This romantic pendant is convertible and can be worn three ways: with both diamond pavé and heart pieces together, or either the center circle or heart frame separately.

 

Rainbow sapphire butterfly brooch, by Dilamani.
A brooch you say? You bet! Dress up any top, scarf, hat—or even a hairstyle—with a brooch. A brooch can also be turned into a pendant with the addition of a chain. So many style options!

 

Custom reversible classic chain bracelet, by John Hardy.
Here’s another “gem” we found: one bracelet with two looks! John Hardy gives you the opportunity to customize your own chain bracelet with any gemstone look. Below is the combo we designed. The 18k bonded gold side sparkles with diamond pavé. The sterling silver side has a pop of color with amethyst. Which look would you create for yourself?

 

Visit an American Gem Society jeweler near you for more helpful hints on what to bring—and what not to bring—on your summer vacation. Happy travels!

Get to Know Your Brown Diamond

AGS Laboratories recently unveiled their new Colored Diamond Document, a grading report that presents the technical aspects and nuances of colored diamond grading to jewelry buyers with easy-to-understand verbiage and graphics.

Brown diamonds will no longer be described simply as “a brown diamond,” but will be communicated in an easy-to-understand visual way, highlighting the nuances within the diamond’s color. For example, a diamond with even distribution of brown throughout and hints of orange, could be described as a deep, rich, brown diamond with moderate orange accents.

Click the image below to view the Colored Diamond Document.

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“Brown diamonds are beautiful and are an alternative choice to the more traditional colorless diamonds. They are also trending as an affordable choice for fine jewelry,” said Jason Quick, Laboratory Director at AGS Laboratories. “We recognized a growing need in the market and decided to create a tool that will truly enhance consumers’ buying experience.”

AGS Laboratories encourages jewelry buyers who are shopping for diamonds to always ask for a diamond grading report from an independent third-party laboratory so that they can better understand the quality of the diamond they are buying. To find an American Gem Society retailer, visit americangemsociety.org/findajeweler.

To learn more about AGS Laboratories Colored Diamond Document, visit agslab.com/browndiamonds.

Here are a few designs we love from members of the American Gem Society that feature brown diamonds.

Celebrate the Woman Who Means Everything

By Robin Skibicki

“Being a mother is about learning about strengths you didn’t know you had and dealing with fears you didn’t know existed.” – Linda Wooten, author.

When I was 9 years old, I asked my Mom on Mother’s Day why there isn’t a Children’s Day. Without hesitation, she responded in a kind but firm voice, “Honey, EVERY DAY is Children’s Day.” I knew that tone and I also detected that wasn’t the best question to ask at that moment.

Now that I’m a mom, I get it! In fact, I believe mothers truly need more than one day a year to call their own. How about once a month? The list of gratitude towards our mothers can be infinite, from the little things, like kissing a “boo-boo,” to jumping in with all her heart and soul to help us through a rough situation.

Nowadays, we realize that Mother’s Day isn’t just about mothers. The holiday extends to celebrate all the incredible women who have made significant contributions in our lives, helping us become who we are today. She can be a stepmom, mother-in-law, grandmother, daughter, daughter-in-law, aunt, sister, cousin, friend, teacher, or mentor.

If you are looking for a gift that is beyond special and significant for a fabulous female in your life, consider fine jewelry. They’re not only gifts that will make her smile (possibly with a glistening tear in her eye) once she opens it, but each day she wears it. She will treasure it for years to come and it will ultimately become a cherished heirloom.

The credentialed members of the American Gem Society (AGS) have got you covered for Mother’s Day. Here are a few ideas to get you started. If there is a design you like or have an idea of your own, contact an AGS jeweler near you!

Seeing Green: The Perfect Jewelry for St. Patrick’s Day

Blog article courtesy of the American Gem Society (AGS) member, Malak Jewelers. Featured photos were contributed by members of the AGS.

Art Deco emerald and diamond bracelet by Nash James.

Art Deco emerald and diamond bracelet by Nash James.

Throughout the world on March 17th, the streets fill with laughter, dancing, and most of all, the color green.  St. Patrick’s Day began as a religious feast day observing the death of St. Patrick. But now it has turned into a variety of festivals across the globe, celebrating Irish culture with parades, special foods, music, dancing, and a whole lot of green.

If you are at a loss for what green to wear, or just want to add more green to your outfit, here are four of the most well-known green gemstones that will add sparkle and color to your St. Patrick’s Day.

EMERALDS

Emeralds were first found in Egypt in 330 B.C. The name “emerald” derives from the Greek word smaragdos, which was a term used to refer to the greenest of gems. Emeralds can come in varying shades of green and some feature blueish hints. The green color comes from trace amounts of chromium and vanadium in the mineral beryl. Its color symbolizes the rebirth and renewal of spring, and that is why it is the birthstone for the month of May. It’s also a popular gem for the 20th and 35th wedding anniversary.

Emeralds are typically formed in six-sided prisms, so they are naturally suited for the emerald cut for jewelry. They are mostly found in Colombia, Zambia, Brazil, and Zimbabwe. North Carolina is also a minor source for emeralds.

PERIDOT

Peridot’s name comes from the Arabic term faridat which means “gem.” Peridots were referred to as the gem of the sun by the Egyptians because of its bright color, which ranges from light to dark green and yellowish green. Most commonly it is seen in pale olive but can be bright golden lime. The mesmerizing color comes from trace amounts of iron within the mineral.

Peridot is the birthstone for August and the gem for the 16th wedding anniversary. The leading producer of peridots is in the San Carlos Indian reservation in Arizona.

ALEXANDRITE

The first alexandrites were discovered in Russia in the 1830s. The gemstone is named after Czar Alexander II. It is often described as “emeralds by day and rubies by night” because it is blueish, green in the daylight and purplish, red in incandescent light. Alexandrites change color because they are a rare variety of the mineral chrysoberyl. This gem provides dramatic proof of how a light source can affect the color of gemstones.

If you know of any June babies or a happy couple celebrating their 55th wedding anniversary, then alexandrite makes a treasured gift!

JADE- JADEITE

The names “jade” and “jadeite” come from the Spanish phrase piedra de ijada meaning, “stone of the lions.” They may sound similar, but they have totally different chemical, optical, and physical properties, with jadeite being the more valuable of the two.

Most of the classic jade (nephrite jade) comes from China, whereas Myanmar is the main source for jadeite. Jadeites are held in high regard throughout the Asian culture. And in China, nephrite jade is a symbol for purity, good luck, and prosperity. Jadeites come in varying shades of green. The most valuable jadeites are pure “imperial” green, which equals the intensity of emeralds.

 

Malak Jewelers
Malak Jewelers is Charlotte, North Carolina’s premier direct diamond importer, supplier of loose diamonds, and custom design jewelry

Aquamarine: the Cure for the Madness of March

Historically speaking, March is an unusual month. It’s a time of transition, from winter blues to the summertime blue of swimming pools. It’s a windy month, too, and the weather can be fickle as one day is cold and the next is warm. It’s supposed to be the first month of spring, but sometimes it feels like the final month of winter.

Even literature has a conflicted relationship with the month. Shakespeare warned Caesar to “Beware the ides of March” in his eponymous play, “Julius Caesar.”

Despite the ups and downs of March, there is one bright, shining and beautiful factor. Aquamarine.

It’s a word which evokes the sea.

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Beautiful aquamarine gems. Courtesy of Suna Bros.

Aquamarine is most often light in tone and ranges from greenish blue to blue-green; the color usually is more intense in larger stones, and darker blue stones are very valuable. This gemstone is mined mainly in Brazil but also is found in Nigeria, Madagascar, Zambia, Pakistan, and Mozambique.

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Aquamarine and diamond ring from Suna Bros.

Like emeralds, this gemstone is a variety of a mineral called beryl. Large stones have been found all over the world, including one stone found in Brazil that weighed over 240 pounds. Aquamarine grows in large, six-sided crystals that can be up to a foot long, making it a great gem to be cut and polished in larger carats for statement pieces.

Not only is aquamarine one of the March birthstones, it’s also used to celebrate 19th wedding anniversaries. It’s a beautiful stone with little or no yellow in it, so it looks great in many settings with different colored metals and gemstones.

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Opal pendant surrounded by aquamarine and diamonds. From Yael Designs.

First, visit an AGS jeweler, who will be happy to help you pick out the perfect piece. Next, look at the stone’s cut. Since aquamarine can be very lightly colored (and sometimes appear almost colorless), the cut is very important to the overall appearance of the stone and how saturated, or even, the color appears.

Of course, choose the color that most appeals to you, however, it’s generally accepted that lighter colored aquamarines are less valuable than the stronger, deeper hues of blue or blue-green.

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Aquamarine and diamonds in a gold setting.
From Erica Courtney Jewelry

Next, take a look at the stone’s clarity. Most cut gems do not have inclusions that are visible to the eye, and some rarer or more expensive aquamarines are available without visible inclusions, as well.

Since aquamarine crystals can grow to be quite large, larger cut gemstones are possible to purchase as a part of beautiful statement pieces. While you may not be looking to buy in that range, even smaller aquamarines make for lovely solitaires or companion jewels in larger pieces.

Ready to see aquamarine up-close and in person? Find an AGS Jewler here. Just don’t forget to bring your jacket. . . or not. It’s March, after all. Who knows what the weather will be like?