Silver Shines On

By Robin Skibicki

The popularity of silver jewelry never seems to ebb, as designers are finding new and artistic ways to style the affordable and malleable metal. Whether silver is mixed with other metals or set with diamonds and gemstones, it’s a go-to look that complements a wide range of colors and styles.

For centuries, silver has been prized for its incredible luster and workability. In this industry, we naturally think of it as a versatile metal used to design beautiful jewelry. But it’s also applied towards technology and industry, used in the home, and often considered for investment purposes.

Pure silver is highly tarnish-resistant but is too soft to use for jewelry design. Other metals like copper, nickel, or zinc, are added to harden silver. For example, sterling silver is 92.5% silver and 7.5% another metal. Silver products sometimes may be marked “925” which means that 925 parts per thousand are pure silver.

Some jewelry may be described as silverplate: a layer of silver is bonded to a base metal. According to the law, quality-marked silver also must bear the name or a U.S. registered trademark of the company or person that will stand behind the mark.

If you’re looking for an inexpensive metal for your fine jewelry, silver is a good choice. Since silver is soft and scratches easily, it’s best used for jewelry that is not worn daily.

The versatile beauty of silver is showcased in these designs by our credentialed AGS members.

Michael Schofield & Co.

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A twin fish motif artfully decorates a sterling silver cuff.

 

Breuning

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Petals of silver and silver coated with yellow gold feature a sapphire center.

 

MK Diamonds & Jewelry

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Sterling silver earrings featuring pear-cut blue topaz and blue sapphires set in black rhodium sterling silver.

 

Parlé

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Sterling silver Australian boulder opal and sapphire pendant.

 

Ed Levin Jewelry

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Sterling silver Secret Heart Bracelet “swings open” to reveal a secret heart.

If you’re in the market for silver jewelry—perhaps you like one of the designs pictured above—or have some silver jewelry that needs some TLC, visit a credentialed AGS jeweler near you.

Ignite Your Passion for Purple!

Amethyst is a violet variety of crystal quartz. Macro Texture purple crystals.For some, the color purple calms the mind and nerves. It encourages creativity and offers a sense of spirituality. It can signify royalty, virtue and faith, wealth and position, and courage. Purple unites the “wisdom” of blue and the “love” of red. It’s the distinguishable color of February’s birthstone, amethyst, which seems quite apropos for a month often associated with love and passion!

Amethyst is a purple quartz exhibiting a beautiful blend of violet and red that can be found all over the world, including the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Zambia. The name comes from the Ancient Greek, derived from the word “methustos,” which means “intoxicated.” Ancient wearers believed the gemstone could protect them from drunkenness.

While amethyst is most commonly recognized to be a purple color, the gemstone can actually range from a light pinkish violet to a deep purple that leans more towards blue or red, depending on the light. Sometimes, even the same stone can have layers or color variants, so the way the gemstone is cut is important to the way the color shows in a finished piece.

Today, many wearers simply prize the amethyst for its beautiful shade and the way it complements both warm and cool colors. Below you’ll find designs by our AGS members which feature the amazing amethyst. Click on the image to get a closer look.

Have any of these designs ignited your passion for the peaceful purple quartz? If you are in search of fine jewelry featuring amethyst—or if you’d like someone to design a special piece for you—get in contact with a jeweler you can trust. Search for an AGS jeweler near you, https://www.americangemsociety.org/en/find-a-jeweler.