The Folklore of Emerald

Emerald is one of the four precious gemstones and is made from green beryl. Its name is derived from the Greek word smaragdus, meaning “green gem.” The stone’s color can range from light green with yellow or blue tones to a deep, dark green.

three emerald gemstones sitting on dark brown leather

Not only is emerald the birthstone for May, but it’s also linked to Gemini, Taurus, Leo, and Aries astrological signs.

Legends say that emerald has calming effects and loving energy. Some people use this gem in their daily meditations to help reduce stress. The green color invokes symbols of nature and money, leading many to believe in its ability to bring abundance to the owner.

It has been known as the “Stone of Successful Love,” representing inspiration, patience, and unity. Centuries ago, it was linked to the goddess Venus. Many people have given emerald jewelry as gifts to their romantic partners.

Other folklore has stated that emeralds relieved issues in muscles, eyes, the spine, and the chest area. It was believed to have rejuvenating properties.

If you’re looking for emerald jewelry for yourself or a friend or someone with a May birthday, find an American Gem Society jeweler near you.

NOTE: The above is intended to educate on the myth, legend and historical lore of emerald and is not meant to be interpreted as fact.

The Folklore of Diamond

The diamond is one of the most well-known gemstones—if not THE most well-known. This precious gem is solely made of carbon and is incredibly tough. The legends are true: only another diamond can cut a diamond. However, have you heard other the legends and lore of this beautiful gemstone?

5 diamond rings on one woman's finger

Many ancient civilizations believed that this “King of Gems” was lightning made real on Earth. They also believed diamonds had incredible healing powers, such as the ability to cure brain disease, alleviate pituitary gland disorders, and draw toxins from the blood.

Hildegard of Bingen, the German mystic, said that sucking on a diamond would prevent lying and aid in the ability to fast from food. In folklore, diamonds could prevent fear and anxiety.

Legend has it that diamonds can promote creativity and imagination in those who wear them. People have felt the gems could open their minds to impossible ideas being possible. It was also believed that diamonds symbolized wealth and the ability to manifest abundance.

Since ancient times, the diamond has been a symbol of eternal love, trust, and faith. This is why diamond engagement rings are so popular.

If you’re looking for a diamond engagement ring, a stunning diamond piece for a friend’s April birthday, or something special for yourself, find an American Gem Society jeweler near you.

NOTE: The above is intended to educate on the myth, legend and historical lore of diamonds and is not meant to be interpreted as fact.

The Folklore of Bloodstone

This ancient gemstone was used by the Babylonians to make seals and amulets. Bloodstone was believed to have healing powers, especially for blood disorders. It is sometimes called the “martyr’s stone,” as legend tells that it was created when drops of Christ’s blood stained jasper at the foot of the cross.

Close-up of Bloodstone

Many other ancient cultures believed bloodstone gems had magical powers, with some references to its ability to heal dating back to 5000 BC.

The Babylonians used bloodstone in their divination, and the Egyptians prized bloodstone because they believed it helped them to defeat their enemies. They also believed it increased their strength or made them invisible.

Still, others believed that bloodstone could help control or change the weather, win legal battles or give the gift of prophecy. It was so loved for its properties, many used the gemstone in jewelry, signet rings, and even small cups or statues.

Today, some still wear bloodstone jewelry as a lucky charm. No matter how you use or wear bloodstone, it’s a unique gemstone great for everyday wear.

If you’re looking for bloodstone jewelry for yourself or someone with a March birthday, find an American Gem Society jeweler near you.

NOTE: The above is intended to educate on the myth, legend and historical lore of bloodstone and is not meant to be interpreted as fact.