Tips from Jewelers Mutual: Who Insures the Engagement Ring, Bride or Groom?

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Today, we are lucky to have the ability to insure both our meaningful and much-needed valuables. Who would have thought that one day, we would insure our phones!

This same rule-of-thumb (or rule-of-ring-finger, in this case) should be applied to an engagement ring. From the day it’s purchased, to that special moment it’s placed on your beloved’s finger, anything could happen.

We’ve all seen those nightmarish videos of an engagement ring dropping into the ocean, falling off a bridge, or being left behind in lost luggage. But who is supposed to handle the insurance, the bride or groom?

Jewelers Mutual Insurance Group has the answer to this question! Be sure to read their article, Who Insures the Engagement Ring, Bride or Groom?

Gemstone Spotlight: Tanzanite

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Pear shape tanzanite and diamond ring by United Color Gems.

We often come across a gemstone that inspires us to learn more about its origins and history, as we search out jewelry designs that feature it. Today’s blog spotlights the alternative birthstone for a month other than this one, December. We’re referring to tanzanite.

Tanzanite is the exquisite blue variety of the mineral zoisite that is only found in one part of the world. Named for its limited geographic origin in Tanzania, tanzanite has quickly risen to popularity since its relatively recent discovery.

Zoisite had been around more than a century and a half before this rare blue variety was found in 1967. Trace amounts of vanadium, mixed with extreme heat, cause the blue color – which ranges from pale blue to intense ultramarine with violet undertones.

Due to pleochroism—an optical phenomenon in which a substance displays different colors when seen from different angles—tanzanite must be cut properly to highlight the more attractive blue and violet hues, and deemphasize the undesirable brown tones.

The majority of tanzanite on the market today is heat treated to minimize the brown colors found naturally and to enhance the blue shades that can rival sapphire.

Tanzanite is still only found on a few square miles of land in Tanzania, near majestic Mount Kilimanjaro. Its price and availability are directly tied to mines in this region.

Between its deep blue color and its limited supply, tanzanite is treasured by many—whether you happen to be born in December or not!

 

If you’re drawn to the eye-catching blue, violet, and purple hues of tanzanite, contact an AGS credentialed jeweler near you to find a design that best suits you!

We’re an AGS Jeweler!

We are very proud of our new video, “We’re an AGS Jeweler!”

It’s one thing for us to tell you to shop with an American Gem Society (AGS) jeweler, it’s another thing to actually see why shopping with a trusted, AGS jeweler is so important.

To view our short “We’re an AGS Jeweler” video, click the image below.

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Are you ready to find an AGS Jeweler near you? Click here to get started!