Ignite Your Passion for Purple!

Amethyst is a violet variety of crystal quartz. Macro Texture purple crystals.For some, the color purple calms the mind and nerves. It encourages creativity and offers a sense of spirituality. It can signify royalty, virtue and faith, wealth and position, and courage. Purple unites the “wisdom” of blue and the “love” of red. It’s the distinguishable color of February’s birthstone, amethyst, which seems quite apropos for a month often associated with love and passion!

Amethyst is a purple quartz exhibiting a beautiful blend of violet and red that can be found all over the world, including the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Zambia. The name comes from the Ancient Greek, derived from the word “methustos,” which means “intoxicated.” Ancient wearers believed the gemstone could protect them from drunkenness.

While amethyst is most commonly recognized to be a purple color, the gemstone can actually range from a light pinkish violet to a deep purple that leans more towards blue or red, depending on the light. Sometimes, even the same stone can have layers or color variants, so the way the gemstone is cut is important to the way the color shows in a finished piece.

Today, many wearers simply prize the amethyst for its beautiful shade and the way it complements both warm and cool colors. Below you’ll find designs by our AGS members which feature the amazing amethyst. Click on the image to get a closer look.

Have any of these designs ignited your passion for the peaceful purple quartz? If you are in search of fine jewelry featuring amethyst—or if you’d like someone to design a special piece for you—get in contact with a jeweler you can trust. Search for an AGS jeweler near you, https://www.americangemsociety.org/en/find-a-jeweler.

Tips from Jewelers Mutual: How to Clean & Care for Your Diamond Engagement Ring

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Diamond engagement ring by Royal Asscher.

If you store your fine jewelry safely, clean it regularly and take it to the jeweler to be inspected when you can, it will likely stay in excellent condition.

Diamond engagement rings, however, require special consideration.

Fine jewelry often stays in storage until a special occasion comes along that calls for its glittering presence. Given that most engagement rings are worn daily, additional cleaning and care habits should be ingrained in order to have a diamond that really lasts forever.

Jewelers Mutual used their 100-plus years of jewelry protection expertise to create a guide specifically filled with time-tested advice for diamond engagement ring wearers. Get your free guide here: How to Clean & Care for Your Diamond Engagement Ring. Your beautiful diamond will thank you.

Four Fun Facts About January’s Gemstone

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Rhodolite garnet and emerald sunbeam earrings by Ricardo Basta Fine Jewelry.

If you’re celebrating a birthday or any special occasion this month, then the garnet is a worthy addition to your fine jewelry wardrobe. Here are four fun facts about the colorific January gem:

1. Not all garnets are red.

Garnet is actually the name of a group of minerals that comes in a rainbow of colors, from the deep red of the Pyrope garnet to the vibrant green of Tsavorites. Some rare garnets are even blue, colorless, or—most rare of all—change colors in different lights. But the most common color is a beautiful range of reds, from rust colored to deep violet-red.

2. It’s more than just a gemstone.

For thousands of years, the garnet has lived a glamorous life as a gemstone. But in the past 150 years, it has also been put to the test as an effective industrial mineral. In the United States, garnet has been utilized for waterjet cutting, abrasive blasting, and filtration.

3. Their inclusions make them unique.

Some garnets have inclusions that are part of the beauty of the overall stone (like “horsetails” in Demantoid garnets, or Hessonite garnets which sometimes have a “turbulent” look). So you may discover that you like the distinctive look these inclusions bring to the piece.

4. Garnets have been around for a very long time.

The garnet is so durable, remnants of garnet jewelry can be found as far back as the Bronze Age. Other references go back to 3100 BC when the Egyptians used garnet as inlays in their jewelry and carvings. The Egyptians even said it was the symbol of life. The garnet was very popular with the Romans in the 3rd and 4th Century.

Today, the garnet can be found in a range of jewelry pieces and styles, from beautiful rings to stunning tiaras. Since the garnet can come in a range of colors, rare garnets in green or blue make breathtaking pieces, especially in pendants or drop earrings.

Here are a few designs from AGS members featuring the many colors of the garnet. Click on the images for a larger view.

To learn more about the wide range of garnet color options and to pick the perfect piece, search for an AGS jeweler near you!